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Christopher Schwarz's candid exploration of woodworking research sheds light on both traditional and modern tools for uncovering historical texts and images. His witty narrative reveals the craft of extracting hidden gems from old texts and leveraging technology, like Google Translate, to bridge language gaps. A compelling glimpse into the meticulous world of woodworking research.

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One glue nerd here. That is an amazing reference on glues. Wish I had stumbled over it sooner.

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I have a question about hide glue.

I am interested to know why sometimes you say that hide glue makes you loose 20 point of the IQ score. I think I heard something like that or am I dreaming.

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I am curious that as someone who quite sensibly states: "I am tired of being surveilled by corporations," you would be comfortable using Google.

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Chris, another option to explore (that I have just touched the surface with) is ChatGPT from OpenAI. I fed the first page of the text into it, and it returned the following:

"Exploitation of Woods, or Means of Obtaining an Advantageous Profit from Coppices, Half-Cuttings and High-Cuttings, and of Estimating Their Value: With a Description of the Arts Practiced in Forests, which are Part of the Complete Treatise on Woods and Forests. By M. DUHAMEL DU MONCEAU, of the Royal Academy of Sciences; of the Royal Society of London; of the Imperial Academy of St. Petersburg; of the Academies of Palermo and Besançon; Honorary Member of the Society of Edinburgh; and of the Academy of Marine; of Several Agricultural Societies; General Inspector of the Navy. A Work Enriched with Copperplate Engravings. FIRST PART."

In English, this text appears to be the title of a book on the exploitation of woods and forests, written by M. Duhamel Du Monceau. The book is part of a larger treatise on woods and forests, and includes illustrations. The book was published by H. L. Gusr & L. F. DE LA on the rue S. Jacques in S. Thomas d'Aquin.

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Dec 9, 2022·edited Dec 9, 2022

Old and new tools is a fascinated subject. Let us put them in the perspective of mass production and hand production. Stanley always adopted the mass production model which delivered planes evolving into different types of the same line through the years ( type 1,2,3,4,.. 16,18) . Japan instead still connected to the hand making and tradition. What is the best approach ? Then came the premium with massive weight and hesitation for innovation, but perfect in the precision of making ! And finally there are places where old style european wooden planes are the only sustainable option ( the ones you see in Chris's Ingenious mekanicks )Very interesting indeed even because as often stated the attention is then focused on the final creation.

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"Ingenious Mechanicks" ? Well, that is good stuff ! A book with no need of review

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Wow ! I am waiting for 'The Art of making various kinds of Glue'

available in Lost Art Press !

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Large fonts please, I am getting old

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My biggest joy of the day thus far has been reading in Duhamel on strong-glue. Which probably says something unflattering about me and my life, but I’m long since over that sort of thing. Thanks for the link. Oh, and I enjoyed the brief description of your means of finding older literature. I was reminded of how, in bygone years, researchers became intimate with the Reader’s Guide to the Periodical Literature. I doubt that even exists any more.

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author

Oh my – your "Reader's Guide comment is giving me flashback headaches!

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Interesting. I had an uncontrollable trembling for hours afterwards, followed by inexplicable sobbing…. Or perhaps not so inexplicable. I recall once awakening from a bad dream that featured me trapped in the library under a mound of Reader’s Guide volumes, missing a final exam. Oh, the horror!

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I do not get the French side of it but if I am told the English translation is

decent, I am going for it ! :) This is something

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I was reading the English translation. I would not say it is great, but it seems to me that it is reasonably accurate, and interesting. At least for those of us who find this sort of thing interesting!

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Just wanted to write a quick note and tell you that I really like your new blog.

I thought I'd offer up some other options for translations since you seem to be doing a lot of it.

I've had good luck with DeepL. It's a German translating app company that seems to give me more accurate translations than Google, but I still use both. there is a limit to what the free version will let you do, but the paid version allows you to translate thousands of words at a time, has a single word look-up, and will allow you to translate directly from an online site or pdf without doing a paste and copy.

I also like WordReference which will give you conjugations as well, and Reverso is very good when you're dealing with phrases and slang or sayings that the other translation apps get wrong.

Can't wait to see what the Hungarian translation will produce.

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Ooh la la.

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Yes, and excuse me, obviously not the right place to talk about old french translation problems! But this book is truly gold about the old trades around the wood. It's been reprinted recently along other books by Duhamel du Monceau! https://www.hachettebnf.fr/recherche?search_api_views_fulltext=Duhamel%20du%20Monceau

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because in regaling the badly cut woods, we procure such trunks: because by gifting these badly cut woods, we get such stumps? "souche" is stump not trunk.

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There's a misunderstanding on "régale", it has nothing to do with a king privilege, it must be understood as its first meaning which is a small present. The wood full of knots is unusable, can't be riven for firewood so it's gifted to the "bûcherons" if they can make something out of it!

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"orne" is old french for row or line, it gave "ornière", the trace left by a wagon wheel.

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I think "l'encoudure" is were the wood have an elbow "coude" , meaning not straight anymore.

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I have to wonder about the translation of Dumhamels translation in Articles 3. title Abatteur (feller) and Bucheron this should be bucker. Bucheron translates to lumberjack which is a broad term in the timber harvesting industry. The work he describes is bucking. Those were the terms we used in the 60's when the old man got a contract to select cut all the timber in A Girl Scout camp in Angels Camp, Ca. (he had prior experience logging) He didn't let me do any falling because it is more dangerous in crowded trees. You had to drop them between trees and watch for widow makers. We cut everything bigger than thirty six inches in diameter at the base. My buddy and I where buckers, and we had to split enough wood by had to fill a one ton staked flat bed with fire wood stacked. The best part of that adventure was the WW2 jeep and mucking about in the snow and mud at lunch time.

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